Handling Vintage Fabrics

With vintage clothing becoming ever-more popular amongst fashion, it is a good idea to understand exactly how best to handle the various fabrics that can go into making vintage clothing, especially if you have picked up a legitimately old item rather than purchasing something that has been created in a vintage style.

With that in mind here are a couple of tips that should help your new find last longer and ensure that you get plenty of use out of it. Continue reading “Handling Vintage Fabrics”

Caring for fabrics – Velvet

Velvet has a reputation as being one of the most luxurious fabrics out there and with good reason. It is beautifully soft to the touch and can be used to craft some absolutely beautiful creations.

Unfortunately this quality comes at something of a price, as the fabric is also rather difficult to care form, which can lead to some problems when it comes time to clean it or if you need to store it properly.

With that in mind, here are a couple of tips to consider when you are cleaning velvet to make sure you get the absolute most out of the fabric.

Read instructions

It may seem like something of a moot point, but before you do anything with your velvet be sure to read any manufacturer instructions that you have available to you. If it is an item of clothing, most good manufacturers will include a label telling you how best to wash it.

Bear in mind that, whether you are talking about fabrics or full items of clothing, different types of velvet require different cleaning methods. Crushed velvet can be put in the washing machine, but fine velvet needs to be dry cleaned. If you are unsure don’t take the risk and simply ask a professional dry cleaner.

Steam rather than iron

Never, ever iron velvet. The weight of your iron will cause a multitude of problems with the fabric and will generally wind up leaving a mark no matter how lightly you press. Furthermore, as velvet is quite a fine fabric, if you do iron it there is a high probability that you will scorch it and make it completely unusable.

Instead, try to pick up a handheld steamer. It doesn’t take much to get creases out of velvet and a steamer will ensure you are putting no weight on the fabric and there is no risk of burning it. Just be sure to avoid getting it wet wherever possible.

Value your local dry cleaner

If you scorch your velvet then there may be no hope left, but if there are stubborn stains or creases that you simply can’t get out your local dry cleaner may well be able to help. They will have tools at their disposal that aren’t necessarily available to you and will be able to advise if a piece is lost or if something can be done to salvage it.

Shaken, not blotted

Accidents happen so when they do be sure that you handle them correctly. If you happen to spill something on your velvet DO NOT blot the stain. This will simply spread it and potentially cause damage to the fabric. Instead, give it a good shake to get rid of any excess moisture and then take it to a professional to get the stain out.

Storing

Finally, storing velvet properly is important. Don’t fold the fabric, as it will crease easily and, if the crease is especially stubborn, you will run into problems getting those creases out. Wherever possible hang the fabric up and give it plenty of room so that it is in perfect condition when you come to use it.

Sewing Tips for Beginners

We all have to start somewhere! If you’re reading this post it is probably safe to assume that you are new to the world of sewing and are eager to get stuck in and start working with a whole host of fabrics to create those amazing ideas that you have floating around your head.

Don’t be too hasty though. A lot of fabric can end up getting wasted if you try to jump right in rather than taking it slow and learning properly. Here’s a couple of tips for the budding tailor or seamstress.

Start small

Before you get to the really cool stuff you will want to practice your technique on a few smaller jobs. That way if you mess up it won’t really matter and will most likely be able to fix the problem in short order as your skills continue to increase. Trust us here, there are few things worse when working with fabrics than getting halfway through a big project and making a mistake.

Work on little things, like tears in the pockets of trousers or reattaching buttons, before you really get started. That experience will serve you will once it comes time to move onto something a little more substantial.

Learn the patterns

Sewing isn’t simply a case of putting thread in a needle and poking it through fabric. There are a wide range of sewing patterns and techniques to learn, all of which will become useful to you as your experience builds and you start working on more complex problems.

Don’t be afraid to spend time practicing a particular stitching technique, even if there is no final product. Getting it right is the most important thing and you will be glad for the practice once you are working on something. Any spare piece of fabric will do for the job so save some cutoffs and just experiment with the patterns you know or have just learned. Have a little fun with it and you will have them down in no time at all.

Machines vs Needles

Perhaps the biggest question for any sewer is what equipment should they use for a particular job. Both sewing machines and needles have particular advantages and disadvantages and many people find they work better with one than the other.

It’s becoming something of a laboured point but it still rings true. The best way to find out is to practice on both and see which one sticks. Obviously for those working to a budget a needle and thread approach is much more cost-effective, but if you do have ambitions to move on to larger projects in the future it is certainly worth investing time and money in a sewing machine. In essence it all boils down to just how intensive you are going to get with your new hobby.

That’s what it all boils down to. For many sewing is a hobby so perhaps the most important tip for the novice is to just enjoy it. Don’t pressure yourself or get upset of you get a pattern wrong. Everybody does. Just relax and practice and you will be working the seams in not time at all.

Caring for fabrics – Linen

This article marks the first in a monthly series that will take a closer look at various fabric types and examine how to best take care of them to ensure you get the absolute most out of them.

The first article will look at one of the most popular fabrics to work with – linen. Linen has been popular for hundreds of years thanks to being an extremely strong and versatile fabric. In fact, it can have as much as two times the strength of other popular fabrics, such as cotton, which is why it has been used for tablecloths and suit wear for many years.

This versatility has also helped it to become one of the most popular fabrics for enthusiasts to work with as well. Of course, like any fabric, it is important to take care of your linen items properly.

Washing

Wherever possible linen should be washed by hand, especially if you have worked with it yourself and included dyes or unique patterns. Alternatively you can opt to dry clean it, but this is not as reliably safe as the hand washing method.

Use water with a cool temperature to ensure the material doesn’t get damaged. While some linens are today being developed to be machine washable, we find it’s best not to take the risk. At least with items that hold personal value. Be as gentle as you can while washing and avoid chlorine bleaches when washing white linens, as this may end up dying them.

Like cotton, linen wrinkles and creases quite easily, however it is very easy to iron these creases out of the fabric. It goes without saying that you should be careful with the iron to ensure you don’t end up burning it.

Colours

Happily linen is one of the easier fabrics to add colour to, as it will readily accept most dyes and, assuming you wash it correctly, will maintain the colour for many years afterwards with only minimal fading after repeat washes.

There are a number of guides floating around online, including this handy one from ehow.co.uk, that demonstrate how best to dye your linen. Just be patient and don’t try to rush things and you will have a gorgeously coloured fabric in no time.

Storage

Linen should always be stored away after cleaning and it is inadvisable to store dirty linen. This means that it is always recommended that you clean your linens after use if they are intended to be placed back into storage.

Wherever possible you should avoid folding the fabric. While this isn’t so much of an issue with tablecloths, where the odd fold or crease is expected, it can lead to your fabric developing creases that are very difficult to eradicate. This is especially the case for garments so be sure to hang them up and give them plenty of space. We mentioned before that it is easy to iron linen, however if you put the fabric in a position where a crease or fold becomes ingrained it gets more difficult.

Choosing the Right Fabric

Before you embark on a sewing project it is important to carefully select which type of fabric you will be using. After all, if you end up using something that isn’t suitable for what you have in mind, your creations may not end up being exactly what you are looking for.

Colour, composition and texture of the fabric are all important aspects and you will need to select something that both matches your aesthetic vision while also being easy enough to manage that you can work with it as you need to. As such, choosing the right fabric is crucial. Continue reading “Choosing the Right Fabric”

Creating a Fabric Scrapbook

We all know that the many fabrics sold on this website can be used to create a wide variety of different clothing patterns and styles, but that’s not all that they are useful for. With a touch of creativity many of them can also be used to add an extra touch of magic to more mundane everyday items.

Take scrapbooks for example. We all love to keep photographs of our most treasured memories and the classic scrapbook is one of the best ways to keep a track of all the people and places that make our lives great. So why not add an extra little spark to your by using your spare pieces of fabric to decorate and line your photographs?

Not only will you be creating a unique and stylish scrapbook that is unique to your own personal tastes, but you will also be ensuring that the spare bits of fabric you have end up finding a use, rather than just being thrown away, so you will end up getting the most bang for your buck.

While any fabric is generally fit for purpose when it comes to matting a photo album or creating borders around your pictures, felt is probably the most versatile and customisable.

This material is ideal for many different reasons. For a start it doesn’t fray when it is cut, meaning that you can make nice clean cuts and not have to worry about the edges starting to a look a little bit jagged. Felt allows for straight edges every time, which ensures that your scrapbook will maintain a neat and tidy look.

Not only that but the fabric is also easy manipulate, allowing for holes to be cut and punched into it without too much trouble. Cutting out letters for page titles or creating the perfect space for a photograph is a doddle and the fabric can also be used easily with most glues and adhesives.

Finally, it can also be written on in most instances, if you have decent chalk or a good quality marker pen, meaning that you can truly express your creativity while working with the fabric. It’s available in many different colours too!

That isn’t to say that other fabrics can’t be used for the idea. In fact, many people even prefer the fraying effect that can be gained from using different types of fabrics, which can be manipulated and customised to the heart’s content if you feel it adds to the design of your particular scrapbook.

Combining fabrics can also have an extremely cool effect, allowing for the creation of multi-layered photo borders.

So how do you get started? Luckily it’s nice and easy, so here’s a step-by-step of how to create a photo border using the fabric of your choice.

Creating a photo border for a scrapbook using fabrics

  • You should start the fabric by measuring the photograph you want to create a border for and cutting out a piece of fabric that is 1cm larger on all sides that the photo itself. Use pinking shears to trim the edges as much as possible. If you want to create something more funky than the average square border be sure to leave yourself a little more than the 1cm so that you can have a play around.
  • If you are using a fabric that frays you may need to use shears to tidy up a little bit. Alternatively, if fraying is your style, why not pull at the threads lightly to create a rougher feel?
  • Finally be sure to use a good leather punching kit to create any holes that you think you may need before applying your adhesive. Be sure not to go too crazy with the glue else it will be visible on the photo edges and the sides of the fabric.

There you have it. Just like that you have a scrapbook that is completely unique to you. Don’t be afraid to experiment, especially if you are able to create multiple copies of the photographs.

Hit the fashion, Jack, and come back for more, for more, for more, it’s the Union Jack. What’d you say?

Fabric UK is bringing you one of the most iconic materials… Union Jack on trevira at £4.99/metre.

The Union Jack dress was an item of clothing worn by singer Geri Halliwell at the 1997 BRIT Awards. The mini dress had a flag of the United Kingdom, the Union Jack and on the front a white peace symbol. The next day press from all over the world ensured it made the front page and that moment is remembered as one of the most iconic pop moments of the 1990s and BRIT Awards history.

The Daily Telegraphs recalls it as top in an online poll that was set up to find the 10 most iconic dresses of the last 50 years, beating Marilyn Monroe’s dress and the wedding dress of Princess Diana. Continue reading “Hit the fashion, Jack, and come back for more, for more, for more, it’s the Union Jack. What’d you say?”

Print is the New Black

Print is the new fashion. Printed dresses can be every girl’s favourite summer garment, with fun patterns, shapes, designs and colours. Fabric UK has a wide range of prints available, including designs on cotton, animal print designs, stripes and polka dots. We have everything for everyone. The good news is that if you are a photographer, you get the fabrics FOR FREE for a limited time if you promote them on your blog, stating the source where you got it from and like and share our facebook page. As simple as that. Also, if you are creating video content/tutorials using one of our fabrics, you get them for free. Read on to see how print has been used for fashion! Continue reading “Print is the New Black”

A look at zigzag fabrics

Fabric UK has zigzag fabric available at £12.99. The good news is that if you are a photographer, you get the fabrics FOR FREE for a limited time if you promote them on your blog, stating the source where you got it from and like and share our facebook page. As simple as that. Also, if you are creating video content/ tutorials using one of our fabrics, you get them for free.

A zigzag is a pattern made up of small corners at variable angles, though constant within the zigzag, tracing a path between two parallel lines; it can be described as both jagged and fairly regular. From the point of symmetry, a regular zigzag can be generated from a simple motif like a line segment by repeated application of glide reflection.

The history of the zigzag pattern

Zigzag Bag

Zigzag began life as an architectural embellishment used in Islamic, Byzantine, Norman and Romanesque architecture. Eventually it made its way into fashion, where it became a machine stitch in a zigzag pattern.

Lighting is often described with a zigzag design, with long downward strokes and short backward ones. In pottery, zigzags are a basic decorative pattern that is often seen in the cuts which separate pieces of ravioli pasta.

A zigzag can also be the trace of a triangle wave or a sawtooth wave, while pinking shears are designed to cut cloth or paper with a zigzag edge, in order to lessen the fraying.

In short, the zigzag pattern is extremely popular and flexible enough to be useful in a variety of ways, which makes the issue of the fashion house Missoni and its belief that its own zigzag patterns can be trademarked.

Missoni

Two years ago, the Italian design house Missoni debuted a line of clothing making heavy use of zigzags at the US discount retailer Target. It resulted in website crashes, sell-outs and eBay mark-ups. Missoni is a worldwide brand, known for incorporating zigzag patterns into their designs, and even the logo that appears next to their website is a zigzag.

Following the success of their new clothing line, Missoni found that a large number of people were looking to cash in on their success, creating very similar designs. This raised the question – can Missoni truly trademark their own designs when they are using a pattern that has been so well established for so many years?

One thing we know for sure is that not all clothing with zigzag designs belongs to Missoni because they didn’t invent the concept of the zigzag pattern. Thus they can’t claim to be the source of the pattern, which in turn should mean that the company are unable to protect what they may view as their own intellectual property.

After all, Charlie Brown doesn’t send subliminal coded messages trying to promote Missoni by wearing zigzag patterns.

charlie brown

However, individual designs can be protected as trademarks. Thus, if consumers begin to identify the zigzag style of clothing with Missoni, this places those attempting to replicate it in a much more difficult position as Missoni can then claim some form of trademark. The same is true, to various extents, with other patterns.

The case, and others like it, lend credence to a bill currently being considered by the US Congress that could see increased protection provided to fashion designs. If the bill passes, it would only provide protection to exactly identical designs. This legislation can provide some protection to Missoni against other users who have identical patterns, but it won’t give them ownership of the zigzag pattern.

It’s an interesting time for fashion designers and many will appreciate the extra protections should they come into fruition. In short, it is important to be creative with existing concepts rather than using other people’s ideas and replicating them exactly.

Looking at Crepe de Chine Fabric

When using crepe fabric it is important to note that that there are multiple variations of the fabric, all of which have their own specific uses. Amongst them are canton, crepe-back satin, crepe de Chine, Georgette, marocain, faille, lingerie, mossy, romaine, and rough.

Generally speaking the fabric is usually woven with crepe yarn, which is a hard-twist yarn produced either with a higher number of twists per inch than ordinary yarn or with alternate “S” and “Z” twists. It can be made from many different types of fibre, whether natural or man-made, making it an extremely versatile and flexible type of fabric.

Fabric UK is currently offering a gorgeous black Crepe de Chine for those interested in making something really special. This particular Crepe differs from the traditional hard crepe that is often used in Britain for items such as mourning clothing and nun’s habits as it has a much softer and wavier appearance.

This wave pattern is created using a special process that involves boiling the material after weaving and a reverse twisting pattern that is almost unique to the product.

Over the years the material has gained popularity due to its versatility. It can be made in any colour and is used in a variety of ways, such as:

  • Fringes and embroidery on shawls and scarves
  • Costume making
  • Belly dancing costumes
  • Beautiful flowing curtains
  • Pillow coverings
  • Saris

An important thing to note is that, due to the sift nature of the material, it is prone to occasional creasing and so will need to be regularly ironed to ensure that it looks as good as possible. It’s a small sacrifice to pay for such a gorgeous fabric and we are sure that many of you out there have your own ideas about the best ways to use it.

Crepe fabric is also extremely popular with mainstream fashion designers and it can be regularly seen in some capacity on the dresses worn by celebrities at red carpet events.

One particular example is the stunning ivory Altuzarra silk-and-crepe dress with strappy sandals that was worn by Nicole Kidman at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Check out the picture below to see how the fabric was used to create a gorgeous and stylish dress that really suited the occasion.

Nicole Kidman in Crepe Fabric Dress

 

I think we can all agree that it looks absolutely stunning and there is no reason why you wouldn’t be able to craft your own designs using this gorgeous fabric.Don’t be shy, if Nicole wears it, it’s good enough for you to try it!

Check out our amazing Crepe de Chine fabric and don’t forget that if you post your work on our facebook page using our fabric we will give you 15m of free fabric for a limited time only.